Villages in Trinidad embrace threatened sea turtles, spark tourist boom

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 05/18/2013 - 08:16
Associated Press: Giant leatherback turtles, some weighing half as much as a small car, drag themselves out of the ocean and up the sloping shore on the northeastern coast of Trinidad while villagers await wearing dimmed headlamps in the dark. Their black carapaces glistening, the turtles inch along the moonlit beach, using their powerful front flippers to move their bulky frames onto the sand. In years past, poachers from Grande Riviere and nearby towns would ransack the turtles' buried eggs and hack the critically...
Categories: TOPP News

Fish Feeling the Heat from Global Warming

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 05/17/2013 - 16:47
EcoWatch: A study featured in the current issue of Nature reveals that ocean warming has already affected fisheries around the world over the past four decades as fish populations shift in response to changing sea temperatures. The findings provide an indicator of the effect that climate change has on the distribution and abundance of fish. The study also points to the need for wildlife officials in New England and around the world to give fish and the ecosystems they rely upon a better chance to adapt to...
Categories: TOPP News

Fiji's villagers move uphill to escape global warming's rising seas

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 05/17/2013 - 14:00
Telegraph: Fiji's picturesque Natewa Bay must be a hard place to leave, and for none more so than the villagers of Vunidogoloa, who are preparing to abandon their ancestral home in the face of the rising sea. But they have little choice: big waves now overtop a once-protective sea wall, their salt-polluted vegetation is dying. They are to move as a community a mile inland, and uphill, to a new site on the northern island of Vanua Levu. Devout Methodists, they have named Kenani, Fijian for Canaan – the promised...
Categories: TOPP News

EU fisheries reform plan falls short of outright discards ban

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 05/17/2013 - 08:18
Guardian: Fisheries ministers from across Europe came to an agreement on a sweeping reform of fisheries policies early on Wednesday morning, but fell short of the most ambitious changes that green campaigners had demanded. They agreed to ban the wasteful practice of discarding healthy fish at sea, but most of the ban will be phased in from 2015 instead of this year as had been proposed, and there are significant caveats for some species. Fish quotas will be based on scientific advice on what is the "maximum...
Categories: TOPP News

Smaller Glaciers Boost Sea Level as Much as the Giants

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 22:30
Climate Central: As the planet warms under the influence of rising greenhouse gases, and melting ice drives sea level higher, scientists have focused mostly on changes in the vast ice sheets that cover Greenland and Antarctica. If either one melts substantially or slides into the ocean, the results would be catastrophic. But there's another ice reserve to worry about: the many thousands of smaller glaciers unconnected to continental-scale ice sheets. They're melting, too, and a new report in Science shows that...
Categories: TOPP News

Everest Ice Shrinking Fast, Scientists and Climbers Say

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 20:58
National Geographic: Everest isn't the same mountain it was when Jim Whittaker became the first U.S. climber to summit the peak in 1963. The world's highest peak has been shedding snow and ice for the past 50 years, possibly due in part to global warming, new research says. (Take an Everest quiz.) New analyses show Mount Everest has lost significant snow and ice cover over the past half century. In nearby Sagarmatha National Park, glaciers have shrunk by 13 percent. Weather data reveal the larger Everest region has...
Categories: TOPP News

World's melting glaciers making large contribution to sea rise

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 19:52
ScienceDaily: While 99 percent of Earth's land ice is locked up in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, the remaining ice in the world's glaciers contributed just as much to sea rise as the two ice sheets combined from 2003 to 2009, says a new study led by Clark University and involving the University Colorado Boulder. The new research found that all glacial regions lost mass from 2003 to 2009, with the biggest ice losses occurring in Arctic Canada, Alaska, coastal Greenland, the southern Andes and the Himalayas....
Categories: TOPP News

World's biggest ice sheets likely more stable than previously believed

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 19:52
ScienceDaily: For decades, scientists have used ancient shorelines to predict the stability of today's largest ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Markings of a high shoreline from three million years ago, for example -- when Earth was going through a warm period -- were thought to be evidence of a high sea level due to ice sheet collapse at that time. This assumption has led many scientists to think that if the world's largest ice sheets collapsed in the past, then they may do just the same in our modern,...
Categories: TOPP News

Amazing Sea Butterflies Are the Ocean’s Canary in the Coal Mine

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 14:00
Smithsonian: The chemistry of the ocean is changing. Most climate change discussion focuses on the warmth of the air, but around one-quarter of the carbon dioxide we release into the atmosphere dissolves into the ocean. Dissolved carbon dioxide makes seawater more acidic--a process called ocean acidification--and its effects have already been observed: the shells of sea butterflies, also known as pteropods, have begun dissolving in the Antarctic. Tiny sea butterflies are related to snails, but use their muscular...
Categories: TOPP News

EU Ice2sea report offers new estimates of sea level rise

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 14:00
Summit Voice: After four years of studies and more than 150 peer-reviewed papers, The EU-funded ice2sea program has concluded that melting ice may not contribute as much to sea level rise as some other studies have suggested. Under a moderate greenhouse gas emissions scenario, the contribution from continental ice will likely amount to between 3.5 and 36.8 centimeters (1.4 to 14.5 inches) by 2100, the program`s leaders said this week, unveiling a new report that summarizes their research. The report is online...
Categories: TOPP News

In Post-Tsunami Japan, A Push To Rebuild Coast in Concrete

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 13:01
Yale Environment 360: In the years leading up to the massive tsunami of March 11, 2011, it seemed that Japan’s coastal ecosystems could hardly decline in health any further. Decades of coastal engineering had divided land from ocean, turned quaint seaside towns grey with concrete, and pushed once-familiar species like loggerhead sea turtles and common orient clams towards extinction. Nearly half of the island nation’s perimeter was modified in some way; cliffs comprised most of what remained untouched. Even within the...
Categories: TOPP News

The rising red tide with climate change

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 11:35
PhysOrg: The tattoos on Ashley Cryan's ankles depict a chicken and a pig. Since the days of Captain Cook, sailors have donned the animals' likenesses to help them walk on water and guard against drowning. According to folklore, the animals-which survived shipwrecks more often than humans-had a special power that protected them from succumbing to the sea. Cryan, whose grandfather taught her to sail when she was 11, got her tattoos after surviving a shipwreck. She said they symbolize strength and survival,...
Categories: TOPP News

Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 09:54
Time: It’s easy to forget that global warming doesn’t just refer to the rising temperature of the air. Climate change is having an enormous, if less well understood, impact on the oceans, which already absorb far more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere. Like so much of what goes on in the vast depths that cover more than two-thirds of our planet’s surface, the effect of climate change on the oceans remains a black box--albeit one that scientists are working to illuminate. Here’s one way: fisheries....
Categories: TOPP News

Canada: After Upset Election, Route for Tar Sands to Pacific Doesn't Close

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 07:00
InsideClimate: Environmentalists suffered a setback on Tuesday when British Columbia re-elected a premier who left the door open for approval of two oil pipelines that would carry tar sands oil across B.C. to the Pacific Coast, where it could be exported to the world market. Despite trailing in the polls, incumbent Christy Clark, the leader of B.C.'s Liberal Party, defeated Adrian Dix and his New Democratic Party. Dix had opposed both pipelines, and environmental groups had hoped his win would signal the end of...
Categories: TOPP News

World's most distinct mammals and amphibians mapped

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 05/16/2013 - 01:37
BBC: Scientists have developed the first map of the world's unique and most endangered mammals and amphibians. The map highlights the fact that only a fraction of the areas identified as critical for the conservation of these species are protected. Among the species highlighted by the map are the Mexican salamander, the Sunda pangolin and the black and white ruffed Lemur. The research is published in the journal Plos One. The Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) project has...
Categories: TOPP News

Climate change threatens global fish stocks

Ocean Conserve - Wed, 05/15/2013 - 22:11
Conversation: Ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, a new international study has found, driving up the proportion of warm-water fish being caught and posing a threat to food security worldwide. The new study, conducted by researchers from the University of Tasmania’s specialist… Ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, a new international study has found, driving up the proportion of warm-water fish being caught and posing a threat...
Categories: TOPP News

Amid rapid Arctic warming, U.S. releases new strategy

Ocean Conserve - Wed, 05/15/2013 - 14:00
Climate Central: With ministers from the eight Arctic states meeting Wednesday in Kiruna, Sweden, for the 2013 ministerial meeting of the Arctic Council, the Obama administration has laid out a broad new U.S. Arctic policy that sets strategic goals for how the U.S. will cope with the rapidly changing region. The "National Strategy for the Arctic Region' features the conflicting goals of accessing some of the Arctic's potentially abundant natural resources -- such as oil, gas, and minerals -- and the need to protect...
Categories: TOPP News

Sea levels may rise 69 centimeters until 2100 on ice melt

Ocean Conserve - Wed, 05/15/2013 - 14:00
Bloomberg: Sea levels may rise as much as 69 centimeters (27 inches) through 2100 as water temperatures rise, glaciers melt in the Andes and Himalayas and ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica shed water, European scientists said. The new estimate exceeds a previous forecast of as much as 59 centimeters by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, which didn’t fully account for the effects of melting ice, researchers with the independent Ice2sea project of 24 institutions in Europe...
Categories: TOPP News

Sea levels are rising - but how quickly?

Ocean Conserve - Wed, 05/15/2013 - 14:00
BBC: A deep sea mission of genuine exploration Legacy of Britain's great flood Can UK science navigate around the Valley of Death Is graphene really a wonder-material? Scientists are warning that the level of the sea may rise by slightly more than previously forecast - but they also say that the very worst predictions look much less likely. Confused? If so, you're not alone. The future of sea level rise is one of the most important questions in climate science because so many millions around...
Categories: TOPP News

'Best estimate' for impact of melting ice on sea level rise

Ocean Conserve - Wed, 05/15/2013 - 14:00
BBC: Researchers have published their most advanced calculation for the likely impact of melting ice on global sea levels. The EU-funded team says the ice sheets and glaciers could add 36.8cm to the oceans by 2100. Adding in other factors, sea levels could rise by up to 69cm, higher than previous predictions. The researchers say there is a very small chance that the seas around Britain could rise by a metre. The last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report was highly detailed...
Categories: TOPP News
Syndicate content