Oceans may explain slowdown in climate change: study

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 17:40
Reuters: Climate change could get worse quickly if huge amounts of extra heat absorbed by the oceans are released back into the air, scientists said after unveiling new research showing that oceans have helped mitigate the effects of warming since 2000. Heat-trapping gases are being emitted into the atmosphere faster than ever, and the 10 hottest years since records began have all taken place since 1998. But the rate at which the earth's surface is heating up has slowed somewhat since 2000, causing scientists...
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When It Rains, It Pours: Study Confirms Climate Change Will Keep Driving More Intense Precipitation

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 14:19
Think Progress: Climate change will bring more and more extreme precipitation events this century. A new study from NOAA`s National Climatic Data Center confirms what climate scientists have long been saying about climate change`s effect on the hydrological cycle. If you are not familiar with this term, you are certainly familiar with what it describes. As the sun warms the earth, water evaporates from oceans, lakes, and rivers, which then form clouds that produce rain and snow. More evaporation happens when...
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Rising sea levels threaten big cities, IPCC chair says

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 14:00
Press Trust of India: Rising sea levels due to climate change are threatening the survival of big cities located near coastal areas like Kolkata, Shanghai and Dhaka, said Dr RK Pachauri, chairperson of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). "There is a very high risk in delta cities like Kolkata, Shanghai and Dhaka. They are very vulnerable to the impacts of climate change due to sea level rise and coastal flooding. Both people and property would be affected in such a scenario," Pachauri told reporters....
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Much a-dune about Jersey shore protection project

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 14:00
Washington Post: The question for this tiny barrier island town slammed by Hurricane Sandy is whether an 18-foot-high sand dune would save it or kill it. Mayor William Akers knows that. Sworn to protect everyone in his quintessential shore town — with a boardwalk chock full of pizza joints, custard stands and arcades — he represents people who want the barrier and others who don’t. A line of more-modest protective dunes saved the neighboring borough to the south from widespread damage. So Akers might be expected...
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British Columbia resource champion’s backing questioned

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 14:00
Globe and Mail: The kid with the YouTube rant is young and approachable. He's an actor sporting a black leather jacket, strolling through a West Coast forest and talking about pipelines. "The environment. The economy," he intones. "People think you have to have one or the other. But do you? So many things to think about." And then, he tells us how we might want to think about those things. How we don't have to worry about pipeline spills, since pipelines are monitored 24/7 "by trained experts." Tankers,...
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Scientists See Cruelty in Killing Method Used in Japan's Dolphin Roundup

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 00:01
New York Times: In a new peer-reviewed study, scientists assess the killing method employed by the dolphin hunters of Taiji, Japan, by watching video recorded surreptitiously in 2011 by a German dolphin-protection group, AtlanticBlue. The still image at right is from the video, which can be seen here (but be forewarned; this is not suitable for children - or many adults, for that matter). Here`s the researchers` not-so-surprising prime conclusion: This killing method does not conform to the recognized requirement...
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Algae Bloom in Florida Kills Record Number of Manatees

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/06/2013 - 16:46
New York Times: Florida’s endangered manatees, already reeling from an unexplained string of deaths in the state’s east coast rivers, have died in record numbers from a toxic red algae bloom that appears each year off the state’s west coast, state officials and wildlife experts say. The tide has killed 241 of Florida’s roughly 5,000 manatees, according to the state Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, and the toll appears certain to rise. The number of deaths from the tide far exceeds the previous annual record...
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Manatee death toll rises in Florida even as toxic algae ebbs

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/06/2013 - 14:00
Reuters: A deadly algae bloom that killed a record number of manatees has dissipated, though the death toll for the endangered sea mammals continues to rise, Florida wildlife officials said on Thursday. Red Tide has killed 241 manatees this year as of Wednesday, said Kevin Baxter, spokesman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg, Florida. The figure already surpasses the highest number of Red Tide manatee deaths on record in Florida - 151 in 1996. This year's fatalities...
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Corals can survive warmer seas if humans don't meddle

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/06/2013 - 14:00
New Scientist: Coral reefs might be able to take the heat of climate change -- if left well alone. A new study suggests reefs that are spared human interference can survive episodes of severe coral bleaching. When corals are stressed - by a sudden rise in the temperature of seawater or a change in its chemistry, for instance - they can no longer provide nutrients to the photosynthetic algae that live symbiotically within them. As a result the corals lose both the algae and their rich hues, which stem from the...
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Greenland melt turns to music

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/06/2013 - 14:00
Living on Earth: Greenland's 2012 summer ice melt was the largest on record. Ice specialist Marco Tedesco visits Greenland every year, and, tired of trying to convey the science of the melting ice with graphs and statistics, he found someone who could turn his data into music. Living on Earth's Emmett FitzGerald has the story. Transcript CURWOOD: Well, a team of scientists and artists at the City College of New York has come up with a way to listen to glaciers melting. It's all part of a multimedia exhibit...
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NOAA expanding dolphin-safe tuna certification requirements

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/06/2013 - 12:27
LA Times: When the World Trade Organization found last year that U.S. labeling requirements for dolphin-safe tuna put Mexican tuna fishermen at a trade disadvantage, marine advocates worried that the federal government would weaken its dolphin-safe standards. Instead, a proposed rule published Friday by the National Marine Fisheries Service would expand the certification requirements. In the eastern tropical Pacific -- which roughly extends from San Diego west to Hawaii and south to Peru -- dolphins...
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Japan killed record low number of whales

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 21:44
Mongabay: Japan blamed environmental activists for a "record low" take during this year's whaling season in the Southern Ocean, reports Kyodo News. Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi said the recent hunt yielded only 103 Antarctic minke whales and no fin whales, according to the agency's web site. The target had been 1,000 whales for the 48-day whaling season. Hayashi said relentless harassment by Sea Shepherd, an anti-whaling group, disrupted the hunt four times and forced...
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Rising Seas Swallow 8 Cities in These Climate Change GIFs

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 20:35
Mashable: Climate change and global warming may cause sea levels to rise and flood coastal cities across the world. Over the past century, the Global Mean Sea Level has risen by 4 to 8 inches. And according to estimates by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PDF), it will keep rising between 8 inches and 6.6 feet by 2100. How will the world look if that happens? In November of 2012, The New York Times published interactive maps displaying the effects of the sea level rising, in a series titled...
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How climate change may help a penguin colony

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 17:47
Mother Nature Network: Antarctic warming has been a boon for one large colony of Adélie penguins, a finding that's surprising scientists. A recent study found that over the last 60 years, a colony of the birds on Beaufort Island in the Ross Sea, south of New Zealand, increased by 84 percent, from 35,000 breeding pairs to 64,000 breeding pairs. This increase has come as glaciers have retreated from the island, leaving more bare, snow-free ground, where the penguins make their nests, according to the study, published this...
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Remote coral reefs can be tougher than they look

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 14:50
ScienceDaily: Isolated coral reefs can recover from catastrophic damage as effectively as those with nearby undisturbed neighbours, a long-term study by marine biologists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) has shown. Scott Reef, a remote coral system in the Indian Ocean, has largely recovered from a catastrophic mass bleaching event in 1998, according to the study published in Science today. The study challenges conventional...
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New strategy needed to cope with Arctic environmental changes: Report

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 05:00
Reuters: With the warming U.S. Arctic region poised for greater oil and mining development, the White House needs to develop a national strategy that can take environmental decisions on a larger scale, a report issued Thursday concluded. The study recommends greater coordination between federal, state and local agencies to better manage resources in Alaska, said the U.S. Department of Interior's Alaska Interagency Working Group in its report that was presented to President Barack Obama. "It is imperative...
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New Orleans Stench May Be Linked to Exxon Refinery Leak, Coast Guard Says

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/05/2013 - 04:00
Reuters: A "rank" odor that has spread across parts of greater New Orleans may be linked to a leak from the 192,500-barrel-per-day Chalmette refinery, the U.S. Coast Guard investigating the smell said on Thursday. Chalmette, a joint venture between Exxon Mobil Corp and Venezuela's national oil company Petroleos de Venezuela SA (PDVSA), reported a leak early Wednesday morning but it had been quickly contained at the plant, the Coast Guard said. "Chalmette Refinery has worked with (the Louisiana Department...
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Tropical Ice Reveals Rare Climate Record

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 04/04/2013 - 18:03
LiveScience: A new and rare ice core record of tropical temperatures highlights changes in the enfants terribles of world climate, the El Niño/La Niña–Southern Oscillation. The climate record comes from Peru's stunning Cordillera Oriental mountain range, home to Quelccaya, the world's largest tropical ice cap. Researchers trekked to an altitude of more than 18,000 feet (5,600 meters) to probe the ice. The two ice cores (or cylinders of ice) drilled from the Quelccaya hold 1,800 years of climate history,...
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Time is Short: War of the Flea: A Review

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 04/04/2013 - 17:05
Deep Green Resistance: As radicals, we believe that another world--a world without patriarchy, white supremacism, capitalism, colonialism, or ecocide--is possible. But in the face of the reality in which we live our day to day lives, it can become difficult to remember not only the possibility of successful resistance to power, but also its rich and proud history, of which we are a part. This is all the more true when we recognize that a potent resistance movement will have to include militant, underground resistance....
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Climate change means a big financial hit for some industries

Ocean Conserve - Thu, 04/04/2013 - 16:53
Minnesota Public Radio: Last year was an expensive year for insurers. Global economic losses from natural and man-made disasters totaled $186 billion. Extreme weather events in the United States were the most expensive -- Hurricane Sandy alone caused $70 billion worth of damage. On Climate Cast, Kerri Miller and MPR News' Chief Meteorologist Paul Huttner talked about the economic impact of climate change. Here is an edited transcript of their conversation: Kerri Miller: We've been reading a report from the international...
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