United Kingdom: Scientists attack government climbdown on marine protection

Ocean Conserve - Mon, 04/22/2013 - 05:17
Guardian: The UK's top marine scientists have denounced government ministers for reneging on plans to protect marine life by banning the most destructive fishing and dredging in the seas around the British Isles. Sealife, including fish, lobsters, oysters and seahorses, has been in rapid decline for years. A two-year, £8m consultation involving thousands of people and the government's own scientific advisers concluded that 127 marine protection zones (MPZs) were needed to halt the decline. But the environment...
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Watered down? Experts' fury at ministers over plans for protecting British seas

Ocean Conserve - Mon, 04/22/2013 - 00:28
Independent: Scientists and ministers were at loggerheads last night as they blamed one another for letting plans to protect Britain's marine wildlife and habitats descend into "confusion and disarray". An open letter signed by 86 scientists and academics sent to David Cameron accuses him of falling "far short" of delivering a pledge to create a network of Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs). The group claims plans to establish a network of 127 protected areas have been watered down to such a point that the zones...
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Is Sustainability Even Possible?

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 18:17
Scientific American: Some questions to ponder on Earth Day: how much of an environmental problem is the growing human population? And is the problem too many people or the throwaway culture of too many things? A new paper in the journal Science attempts to assess the burdens placed on people and the planet by individuals’ decisions to have large families and/or consume a lot. A key factor in the creation of large families is young women without access to schools or family planning. So one way to address population...
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Wildlife Sanctuaries Along Coasts and Sea Level Rise

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 14:31
ScienceDaily: A new report on the potential effects of climate change on NOAA's Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary uses existing observations and science-based expectations to identify how climate change could affect habitats, plants and animals within the sanctuary and adjacent coastal areas. It also outlines new management recommendations for the sanctuary, and sanctuary officials called it the first step toward addressing them. They also said the report issued by the sanctuary, Climate Change and the...
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Pacific Islanders hold warrior dance day of action to highlight climate change effects

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 14:00
Indian Country: “We are not drowning. We are fighting.” With this clarion call, Indigenous Peoples from 15 Pacific Island nations and territories pulled together for a Warrior Dance Day of Action in early March to send the world a message on climate change. Island nations are some of the most severely affected by the effects of climate change as ocean levels rise and water encroaches on their already small territories. (Related: Arctic and Small Islands Fight Climate Change) These Indigenous Peoples held warrior...
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Norway's ruling party backs oil drilling around Arctic islands

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 11:50
Reuters: Norway took a major step towards opening up an environmentally sensitive Arctic area to oil and gas exploration when the ruling Labour Party gave the go-ahead on Sunday for an impact study. Exploration in the waters around the Lofoten islands just above the Arctic circle is becoming one of the most contentious issues for parliamentary elections in September. The picturesque area had been off limits because it is home to the world's richest cod stocks, with environmental groups and the tourism...
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Greenpeace paints 'illegal' on South Korean ship Premier in Mauritian port protest

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 05:24
Greenpeace: Seven Greenpeace International activists peacefully demonstrated in a Mauritian port on Sunday against a South Korean vessel accused of unlawful fishing in West African waters, demanding the Seoul government order the ship's recall. The activists painted the word "illegal" in Korean and English on the hull of the FV Premier, owned by South Korea's largest tuna company, Dongwon Industries. Activists also held flags and banners calling the ship "criminal" in response to accusations of wrongdoing...
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Florida Sues BP Over Gulf Oil Spill

Ocean Conserve - Sun, 04/21/2013 - 05:00
Associated Press: The state of Florida filed a lawsuit Saturday against the oil company BP and the cement contractor Halliburton over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, becoming the fourth state to seek damages for the 2010 disaster. The suit, among other things, faults BP for not changing the batteries on the rig’s blowout preventer. It also accuses Halliburton of installing faulty cement barriers. The complaint by the Florida attorney general, Pam Bondi, was filed in United States District Court in Panama City....
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Threat to life on Arctic frontline

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 23:35
BBC: A deep sea mission of genuine exploration Legacy of Britain's great flood Can UK science navigate around the Valley of Death Is graphene really a wonder-material? As the days lengthen with the approach of spring, the northernmost reaches of Scandinavia are about to witness the annual migration of huge herds of reindeer. After spending the winter inland in Finnmark, Europe's last great wilderness, the animals are moved to pastures near the coast for the summer. The reindeer play a central...
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EU ban on trade in seal fur set to be overturned

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 23:34
Independent: A Europe-wide ban on the trade of seal fur and products is expected to be overturned this week, in a move that will reignite one of the world's most contentious wildlife issues. The actor Jude Law has written a letter calling for the ban to be upheld, which he says would be "in line with the wishes of compassionate people all around the world". He sent the letter to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) on behalf of the animal rights group Peta a week before the WTO's final hearing on the issue in...
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Reaching an Arctic accord

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 14:00
New York Times: The central Arctic Ocean has been covered in ice for eons, but under the influence of global warming, nearly half of it is now open water for part of the year. Commercial fishing has not yet begun there, but the urge to begin fishing is almost overwhelming. The waters of the central Arctic, an area the size of the Mediterranean, hold the last untouched fishing stocks on this planet. At present, they also lie beyond the boundaries of settled international law — more than a million square miles outside...
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Report eyes Pacific Northwest climate change threats

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 14:00
Summit Voice: Managers of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary say they`ll use a new report to try and prepare the resources they steward for the coming impacts of climate change, including increases in sea level; extreme weather events such as winds, waves, and storms; and coastal erosion from those events. The report also says the region may experience an increase in ocean acidity, rising water temperature, as well as more extreme weather patterns, including Pacific Northwest regional rainfall increases...
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Let Earth Day be our chance to rebuild New Jersey right

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 14:00
Star-Ledger: Monday will probably be the most important Earth Day for people in New Jersey since the first one. As we celebrate the 43rd Earth Day, people will be cleaning up parks and areas of the state that have been devastated by Hurricane Sandy. They will be replanting dunes, fixing beaches and parks and helping neighbors. We will see the impact of climate disruption all around us. It is not just what we do on Earth Day that counts; it is what we do every day dealing with climate change. We will move...
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Mississippi Suing BP Over Gulf Oil Spill

Ocean Conserve - Sat, 04/20/2013 - 02:23
Associated Press: Mississippi has become the third state to sue BP over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. State Attorney General Jim Hood said on Friday that the state had filed suits in federal and state court. Mr. Hood said he wanted to settle, but he said BP refused to negotiate. A spokeswoman for BP did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Louisiana and Alabama sued BP earlier and are participating in a federal trial in New Orleans to determine the liability of BP and its contractors. Mississippi...
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Massive amounts of charcoal enter the worlds' oceans

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 20:59
ScienceDaily: Wild fire residue is washed out of the soil and transported to the sea by rivers. Wild fires turn millions of hectares of vegetation into charcoal each year. An international team of researchers led by Thorsten Dittgar from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and Rudolf Jaffé from Florida International University's Southeast Environmental Research Center in Miami has now shown that this charcoal does not remain in the soil, as previously thought. Instead, it is transported...
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New York’s First Desalination Plant Raises Radiation Fears

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 15:30
Environment News Service: Desalination plants are typically built in dry places. But along New York`s Hudson River a different story is unfolding. A desalination plant has been proposed by United Water New York, a private company, to address the rapid growth of water demand in the expanding New York City suburb of Rockland County. If built, the Haverstraw Water Supply Project on the Hudson River`s Haverstraw Bay would mark New York State's first foray into desalination, the process of removing salt and particulates...
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GOP Goes Hunting For EPA Emails About Turducken

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 14:35
Climate Desk: Earlier this month, when a burst pipe spilled thousands of gallons of heavy oil into an Arkansas suburb, the message from the White House went something like: "Everybody chill, the EPA has it under control." But reporters on the scene found the cleanup orchestrated by the same company, ExxonMobil, that allowed the spill, and heard only crickets when they asked the EPA about its involvement. Turns out, on some of the nation`s most pressing environmental health issues, the EPA`s transparency record...
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Climate change affecting height intensity of global ocean’s waves

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 14:00
International Business Times: A study by Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) has warned that the world's coastline beaches could experience swelling and intense levels and heights of pounding ocean waves due to climate change. Mark Hemer, CSIRO researcher and lead author of the study, said average annual wave heights could increase by as much as half a metre in coming decades as storm frequency and intensity in the Southern Ocean likewise increase. The heightened wave heights...
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Antarctic clams may take a hit from global warming

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 14:00
Summit Voice: Warming ocean temperatures and increased glacial outflow around Antarctica may have a big impact on clams living on the ocean floor. Younger clams try to move away when they sense warmer temperature or reduced oxygen levels, but older clams stay put. The findings by a team of British and German scientists indicate how climate change may affect biodiversity in the region, suggesting that the overall population of Antarctic clams may dwindle, since it`s the older animals that reproduce. “Our...
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Superstorm Sandy shook the Earth

Ocean Conserve - Fri, 04/19/2013 - 14:00
Science: When Superstorm Sandy struck the United States on 30 October, it didn't just devastate the Eastern Seaboard, it shook the ground as far away as the West Coast, producing tiny vibrations in Earth's crust that were picked up by seismometers there. Scientists can use this activity to track the path of the storm. Now, they say that analyzing past records of these vibrations may help them discern whether climate change has influenced the amount of storminess over the world's oceans in recent decades....
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